Carbon Monoxide (CO) Alarms and CO Poisoning

Never Ignore an Alarming CO Alarm!
It is warning you of a potentially deadly hazard.
 

A working smoke and carbon monoxide alarms are the most important device you can have in your home. They provide essential early warning of a problem so you and your family can safely escape.

Requirements for carbon monoxide, or CO, detectors (alarms) went into effect in 2005 for all buildings where people sleep. Carbon monoxide (CO) is a deadly, colorless, odorless, poisonous gas. It is produced by the incomplete burning of various fuels. Carbon monoxide poisoning can mimic flu symptoms such as headaches, dizziness, nausea and fatigue. Higher levels of exposure result in disorientation, drowsiness, unconsciousness and death.

Common sources of carbon monoxide include heating appliances, water heaters, clothes dryers, emergency generators, temporary cooking appliances or space heaters and motor vehicles running in attached garages or adjacent to a building
 

CO Detection and Prevention Rules and Requirements

 

OWNER – OCCUPIED Single Family Free Standing Dwellings

CO alarms are required to be installed in the vicinity of any bedrooms for all new dwellings and dwellings that are sold or transferred.

Carbon Monoxide alarms installed or replaced in a dwelling after July 1, 2005 must be directly wired to the building electrical service and have a battery backup. One and Two family dwellings are allowed to use a plug in style alarm with battery backup.   

Alarms that are hard-wired into the home electrical system should be installed by a qualified electrician. 

 

Information and Forms

CO Alarm Law - 9 VSA § 2883(a) 

Single Family Owner- Occupied Dwelling Carbon Monoxide Alarms Installation Matrix Sheet 

Rental Units, Condos and Multi Family Dwellings or other Residential Buildings

The requirements for CO detection and prevention in public buildings, including multi-family and rental dwellings, have been developed under the administrative rulemaking process and are now included in the Vermont Fire & Building Safety Code.

Condominium ownership of multi-family dwellings subject to the same requirements for CO detectors as required for rental apartments.

Carbon Monoxide alarms installed or replaced in a dwelling after July 1, 2005 must be directly wired to the building electrical service and have a battery backup. One and Two family dwellings are allowed to use a plug in style alarm with battery backup.  

 

Information and Forms

Vermont Fire & Building Safety Code General provisions law 20 V.S.A. §2729(d)

Additional Information Resource Links  

 

CDC - CO Questions and Answers http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/466.html

CO Toxicology Information http://www.coheadquarters.com/CO1.htm

Vermont Dept of Health - CO Information  http://healthvermont.gov/enviro/indoor_air/co.aspx

Northern New England Poison Center - CO Resources for Prevention

 http://www.mmc.org/mmc_body.cfm?id=3094

Guidance for the Fire Service on CO Response  http://www.cpsc.gov/library/foia/foia04/os/resident.pdf.